Tenement landscapes
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Tenement landscapes by Paul David Mena

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Published by A Small Garlic Press in Chicago .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • New York (State),
  • New York

Subjects:

  • City and town life -- New York (State) -- New York -- Poetry.,
  • Haiku, American.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementPaul David Mena.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPS3563.E456 T46 1995
The Physical Object
Pagination13 p. ;
Number of Pages13
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL608059M
ISBN 101888431024
LC Control Number96203625
OCLC/WorldCa35771166

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The Decorated Tenement: How Immigrant Builders and Architects Transformed the Slum in the Gilded Age - Kindle edition by Violette, Zachary J.. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading The Decorated Tenement: How Immigrant Builders and Architects Transformed the Slum in the Gilded Age.5/5(1).   Zachary J. Violette focuses on what he calls the “decorated tenement,” a wave of new buildings constructed by immigrant builders and architects who remade the slum landscapes of the Lower East Side of Manhattan and the North and West Ends of Boston in the late nineteenth : University of Minnesota Press. Zachary J. Violette. Zachary Violette is an architectural and social historian and the author of The Decorated Tenement: How Immigrant Builders and Architects Transformed the Slum in the Gilded Age. He has taught at Parsons School of Design/The New School and . As the multifamily building type that often symbolized urban squalor, tenements are familiar but poorly understood, frequently recognized only in terms of the housing reform movement embraced by the American-born elite in the late nineteenth century. This book reexamines urban America's tenement buildings of this period, centering on the immigrant neighborhoods of New York and Boston.

Zachary Violette will discuss his new book,  The Decorated Tenement: How Immigrant Builders and Architects Transformed the Slum in the Gilded Age. The book explores the little-known but enormous impact that new arrivals from Central, Eastern and Southern Europe had on .   The Decorated Tenement: How Immigrant Builders and Architects Transformed the Slum in the Gilded AgeReviewed by Paul Ranogajec Violette’s important book opens a new chapter on urban housing in architectural history and helps the reader understand a whole set of buildings—indeed, whole swathes of the cityscapes of both New York and Boston—that are prominently visible but often . During this period, tenement landlords were responsible for designing and shaping America's urban landscapes, building housing for the city's ever-growing industrial workforce. Fueled by the illusion of easy money, entrepreneurs managed their buildings in ways that punished compassion and rewarded neglect—and created some of the most haunting. Tenement Landscapes is his first book. Paul lives in Greater Boston, where, in addition to working as a programmer and playing as a poet, he busies himself gathering material for an unauthorized autobiography to be written posthumously. He can be reached by email, and has a homepage called Haiku in Low Places.

The Decorated Tenement: How Immigrant Builders and Architects Transformed the Slum in the Gilded Age. In this Book. Additional Information “decorated tenement,” a wave of new buildings constructed by immigrant builders and architects who remade the slum landscapes of the Lower East Side of Manhattan and the North and West Ends of Boston. In Biography of a Tenement House, Andrew Dolkart provides an overview of the architectural and social history of 97 Orchard Street, now the Lower East Side Tenement Museum in New York ucted in and re-opened as a storefront museum in , the tenement interprets the legacy of immigrants who transformed the urban landscape of New York and the United States. Durgaing this period, tenement landlords were responsible for designing and shaping America's urban landscapes, building housing for the city's ever-growing industrial workforce. Fueled by the illusion of easy money, entrepreneurs managed their buildings in ways that punished compassion and rewarded neglect—and created some of the most Price: $ In Tenement Flats, Millard Sheets showed the urban poor of his native California, structuring the painting to suggest that working Americans provided the foundation for the lives enjoyed by the large houses looming on the hills above the tenements are reminders of the gulf between the classes during the s. Sheets's sympathies are clear.